Tag: course

Nov 25

Course: Gilles Van Assche “Authenticated encryption” (November 24, 2015)

Due the lockdown of the University this Tuesday 24, the presentation of Dr. Ir. Gilles Van Assche about authenticated encryption has been canceled. However the presentation will still be done in the beginning of the second quadrimester during a seminar of the QualSec Research Group (https://qualsec.ulb.ac.be).

Nov 19

Course: Gilles Van Assche “Authenticated encryption” (November 24, 2015)

November 24, 2015 – from 12.00 to 14:00 – ULB – La Plaine – room OF.2064

Speaker: Gilles Van Assche (STMicroelectronics)

Title: Authenticated encryption

Apr 10

ASMx86 Course x86 Disassembly – Wikibooks, open books for an open world

x86 Disassembly – Wikibooks, open books for an open world.

Mar 01

Moxie Marlinspike: GPG Has Run Its Course – Slashdot

Moxie Marlinspike: GPG Has Run Its Course – Slashdot.

Jun 03

Coursera Offers Malware MOOC – F-Secure Weblog : News from the Lab

Coursera Offers Malware MOOC – F-Secure Weblog : News from the Lab.

May 06

Who Has Your Back? 2013 | Electronic Frontier Foundation

When you use the Internet, you entrust your conversations, thoughts, experiences, locations, photos, and more to companies like Google, AT&T and Facebook. But what do these companies do when the government demands your private information? Do they stand with you? Do they let you know what’s going on?

In this annual report, the Electronic Frontier Foundation examined the policies of major Internet companies — including ISPs, email providers, cloud storage providers, location-based services, blogging platforms, and social networking sites — to assess whether they publicly commit to standing with users when the government seeks access to user data. The purpose of this report is to incentivize companies to be transparent about how data flows to the government and encourage them to take a stand for user privacy whenever it is possible to do so.

We compiled the information in this report by examining each company’s published terms of service, privacy policy, transparency report, and guidelines for law enforcement requests, if any. We also considered the company’s public record of fighting for user privacy in the courts and whether it is a member of the Digital Due Process coalition, which encourages Congress to improve outdated communications law. Finally, we contacted each company to explain our findings and gave them an opportunity to provide evidence of improved policies and practices. These categories are not the only ways that a company can stand up for users, of course, but they are important and publicly verifiable. In addition, not every company has faced a decision about whether to stand up for users in the courts, but we wanted to particularly commend those companies who have done so when given with the opportunity.

 

Who Has Your Back? 2013 | Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Feb 09

Hacking Satellite Communications

One more to worry about is the real security of satellite infrastructures.

In a technological civilization, satellites play a vital role in the management and transmission of information of all kinds. Satellites in fact do the work in silent that we enjoy every day, but we often forget this crucial aspect of communications.

Are these powerful systems of communication actually safe? Is it sufficient just to be in orbit thousands of miles above our heads  in order to ward off the danger of an attack? In using satellites, are we sure that nobody could listen in on our communications?

Of course not! The main concern is the possibility of compromising satellite those communications in the context of warfare.

via Hacking Satellite Communications.

Feb 05

Facebook On Collision Course With New EU Privacy Laws – Slashdot

Facebook On Collision Course With New EU Privacy Laws – Slashdot.

Oct 17

10 Most Bizarrely Geeky College Courses

10 Most Bizarrely Geeky College Courses.